New Version of Reconciliation Bill Eliminates Most NG 9-1-1 Funding in the Bill
Friday, October 29, 2021 | Comments

A new version of a massive reconciliation bill introduced by Democrats Oct. 28 drastically cuts the amount of funding appropriated for next-generation 9-1-1 (NG 9-1-1) grants that was included in the first version of the bill.

The original version of the Build Back Better Act included $10 billion in funding for fiscal year 2022 for grants to eligible entities for implementing NG 9-1-1 and maintaining it, as well as related costs, such as training. Under that original bill, the funds would be available until September 30, 2026.

However, the newest version of the bill cuts that amount down to $470 million but would keep those funds available until September 30, 2030. The bill keeps the eligible uses for the funding from the original bill.

The revised bill also cuts the funding appropriated in the original bill to create an NG 9-1-1 cybersecurity center from $80 million to $9 million. The center is intended to coordinate with state, local and regional governments on the sharing of cybersecurity information about, the analysis of cybersecurity threats to and strategies to detect and prevent cybersecurity intrusions relating to NG 9-1-1.

The original version of the bill also included $20 million to help set up a public-safety NG 9-1-1 advisory board, but the new bill cuts that funding down to $1 million.

In March, a bill called the Leading Infrastructure For Tomorrow’s America Act (LIFT America Act) was introduced into the house of representatives. That $312 billion infrastructure act, includes $15 billion in NG 9-1-1 funding and has received support from a variety of public-safety agencies. However, the bill has not moved forward.

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